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Photo by Chris Smith

Italian Renaissance Revival style

c. 1855-60

The Johnston Felton Hay House is one of two National Historic Landmarks in Macon. Designed by New York City architect T. Thomas, it was built for William B. Johnston who was Depositary of the Treasury during the Civil War. He filled the 16,000 square foot residence with many fine furnishings and art work. Notice the Corinthian-columned piazza topped by a cast iron serpentine balustrade, the opposing symmetrical wings with clerestory windows, the ocular windows accented by decorative iron grilles and the three-level octagonal cupola.The Johnston heirs sold the property in the 1920s to P. L. Hay, who also added to the collection of antique furniture and porcelains.The Hay heirs donated the property in the 1970s to the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation which now operates it as a house museum.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1905

This building was constructed on property which was at one time part of the Johnston Felton Hay House tract and is a fine example of the Queen Anne style with Classic Revival detailing. Note the terra-cotta tile roof, brick and marble exterior, the bay window, recessed arched doorway and detailed windows.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1831

One of the oldest homes in Macon, this residence has been altered and enlarged many times but retains its symmetrical Federal floor plan. Delightful Victorian embellishments include a one-story front porch and bay window. Among its 22 rooms is a modern two-story glass solarium in the rear. This house was originally owned by James A. Ralston whose family enterprise, Ralston Hall, was Macon’s best theater for much of the 19th century. In 1890 Alonzo D. Schofield, one of the founders of Schofield Iron Works, bought the property and it remained in the family for more than 80 years. His daughter, Miss Gladys Schofield, was a talented landscape architect who studied in France. The grounds retain much of her design and original plantings.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1887

This residence is one of the finest examples of Queen Anne-style architecture in Macon, with its use of multiple textural features and architectural elements including a slate roof, stained glass, terra-cotta detailing, turrets and gables. Neel Reid made an addition to the rear prior to World War I. Notice the fine carriage house at the rear of the property.

Photo by Chris Smith

Second Empire style

c. 1884

This distinctive townhouse showcases the delightful juxtaposition of fish-scaled, multi-colored slate, stone stringing, quoins, delicate wrought iron and salmon-colored brick. Notice the mansard roof, a distinctive roof style designed by the 17th century French architect, Francois Mansard. The house was built by the owner of a carriage and farm machinery business, and his family lived here for more than 50 years.

Photo by Chris Smith

Greek Revival style

c. 1848

One of two National Historic Landmark houses in Macon, this residence is built in the style of a modified Greek cross with a central rotunda featuring a spiral staircase that ascends to the octagonal cupola. The main rooms feature windows on three sides for maximum ventilation, important in the days before central air conditioning. Its plans are on file in the Library of Congress.

Photo by Chris Smith

Italian Renaissance Revival style

c. 1885

Originally a brick Queen Anne–style house, this residence was redesigned on both the exterior and interior by Macon-born architect Neel Reid after his return from study in Europe. From 1924-27 it was owned by Wesleyan College and served as the president’s house during that time. A later owner operated a Vapobath business here in the late 1920s with steam cabinets occupying several of the rooms in the basement. Notice the fine ironwork gates, 21st century additions that complement the Neel Reid-designed ironwork balconies on the second floor.

Photo by Chris Smith

Neoclassical Revival style

c. 1910

Even though there were many brickyards in Macon during the late 19th century, most residences had a frame construction; brick was used mostly for commercial buildings. This fine frame house has brick veneer. Notice the elegant Corinthian capitals.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1900

Built in the late Queen Anne style, this house features fine beveled and leaded glass, double columns on the front porch and an asymmetrical floor plan. One of its early owners was associated with the Macon Brunswick Navigation Company at the time the Ocmulgee River was navigable down to the Georgia coast. Notice the white marble door and window surrounds.

Photo by Chris Smith

Neoclassical Revival style

c. 1860

Originally designed in the Italianate style with eave brackets and a balustraded one-story porch, it was remodeled in 1901 when 19 sheet metal-covered columns and a decorative frieze were added on three sides. There are no windows on the right side of the front façade because a grand staircase and fireplace are placed against that wall.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1886

This house was built by a well-known local cotton merchant. In 1910 his son inherited the house and undertook renovations in the Classic Revival style. The original cupola was removed and the balustraded porches were enlarged to create one wrap-around porch supported by Georgia marble columns with ceramic capitals. The beveled glass doors, also a 1910 addition, are especially noteworthy.

Photo by Chris Smith

Neoclassical Revival style

c. 1908

This house was built by George Turpin, replacing an earlier house on this site. Later it was owned by J. Freeman Hart, Jr., owner of Harts Mortuary and a founding member of the Middle Georgia Historical Society. He bought several early houses in the 1960s in the College Street area to save them from demolition.

Photo by Chris Smith

Italianate style

c. 1840

This residence retains many of its Italianate details including double eave brackets and low-pitched roof. Later additions include the fine French doors with arched transoms and also the double columns. Notice the decorative fan lights and sidelights.

Photo by Chris Smith

Neoclassical Revival style

c. 1879

Between 1895 and 1908 this house was altered from a two-story residence with a one-story porch and one-story extension at the right front. The gable and Italianate eave brackets can still be seen. The façade became two stories and the existing front porch was added.

Photo by Chris Smith

Italianate style

c. 1840

This house is a restrained example of the bracketed, Italian-style villa that was popular in early Victorian times. It is one of very few early houses on College Street that has not undergone architectural alteration. The house has a sweeping verandah – a feature that well-served Southern homes as an outdoor living room. Records show that the massive front door was hand-carved in New England and shipped to Macon by steamer.

Photo by Chris Smith

Neoclassical Revival style

c. 1878

This residence originally had a one-story porch located at the right of the front entry. The two-story portico was added after 1946. Notice the fine transom and side lights at the front door and the well-detailed angular bay window at left.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1892

In 1934 this house was purchased by the grandfather of the present owner of the property. After he sold it, it was converted to apartments c. 1946 and reconverted to a single family house in 1990. The present owners purchased the property in 1997. Notice the round turret with leaded window panes rising from the front façade.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1854

This house’s gabled roof and asymmetrical floor plan are typical of the Queen Anne style. In 1894 it featured a bay window on the front façade, but records show this was removed in a substantial remodeling by architect Neel Reid in 1908. Note the fine sunburst detail in the gabled section above the front steps and the wraparound porch shaded by Deodar cedars.

Photo by Chris Smith

Italianate style

c. 1860

When this house was built the lot was larger and was later subdivided to provide room for two additional houses located at the left of this property. Elements of the Italianate style include the double eave brackets, arched windows and side porches with arched supports. The fine front entry includes an arched transom below a balustrade on the second-floor balcony.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1880

This extraordinary house is unusual because it was built of patterned masonry instead of the wood used for most Queen Anne-style houses. Note the sunburst ornament in the upper pediment, the elaborate woodcut ornamentation in the lower pediment and the delicately turned porch columns.

Photo by Chris Smith

Tudor Revival style

c. 1920

This bungalow replaced an earlier structure on this site. Typical of the bungalow style is the front porch incorporated into the roof structure of the house. The decorative half-timbers are reminiscent of exposed structural beams found on early Tudor-style buildings in Europe during the Middle Ages.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1920-24

This residence replaced an earlier house on this property. However, it may incorporate a portion of the earlier structure because the outline of another staircase in the front room of the present house was uncovered during rehabilitation. Notice the decorative appliqué above the front door.

Photo by Chris Smith

Italian Renaissance Revival style

c. 1900

Notice the hipped, tiled roof, elaborate eave brackets, arched entry and sweeping terraces, all typical of the Mediterranean Villa style. Marble detailing surrounds the door and windows.

Photo by Chris Smith

Neoclassical Revival style

c. 1908

Built as a residence for John C. Holmes, the owner of a candy factory. Later it was the headquarters for the Pilot Club International, a civic organization for executive and business women, which was founded in Macon in 1921 and now has clubs in North America and several foreign countries. It was returned to residential use in 2006. Notice the embossed metal frieze and finely carved columns with Corinthian capitals. The interior features a fine stained glass window and beautiful parquet flooring.

Photo by Chris Smith

Craftsman style

c. 1910

This brick residence, designed by Neel Reid, well-known Georgia architect, replaced an earlier frame house that faced Orange Street. It was built for Mrs. Everett Coleman, whose husband was an insurance agent with Cabaniss, Walker, Coleman and Hatcher. Notice the well-defined portico and second-story window box.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1900

This is a fine example of the Queen Anne stick style with an intricately-detailed wrap around porch, high gabled roof, tall brick chimneys and asymmetrical façade.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1911

These residences were built during the post-Victorian period. Their exteriors feature the asymmetrical floor plan and porches typical of the Queen Anne style. Beveled and leaded glass was used frequently during this period, and the manufacture of large panes of glass was perfected during this era.(Prior to the early 20th Century, most windows featured multiple glass panes). Note the fine glass surrounds at the entries of these houses and the diamond-shaped panes in the dormer windows.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1911

These residences were built during the post-Victorian period. Their exteriors feature the asymmetrical floor plan and porches typical of the Queen Anne style. Beveled and leaded glass was used frequently during this period, and the manufacture of large panes of glass was perfected during this era.(Prior to the early 20th Century, most windows featured multiple glass panes). Note the fine glass surrounds at the entries of these houses and the diamond-shaped panes in the dormer windows.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1870

This early frame cottage has typical Queen Anne features such as the fine bay window beneath a peak and a small-columned porch on the right front which shades the house’s tall windows.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1880

Queen Anne cottages are to be found throughout the Macon Historic District. This residence was once part of the Bond property. Notice the angular bay with Italianate eave brackets and the delicate porch columns.

style

c.

This high brick wall encloses the rear area of the Woodruff House property whose grounds include a small building that was once a carriage house.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1881-84

This Queen Anne-style residence has a commanding view over downtown Macon and Coleman Hill Park. It was originally part of the Bond property which was sold and sub-divided in 1872. Notice the timber detailing, multiple windows in the angular bay and the finely carved double front doors.

Photo by Chris Smith

Greek Revival style

c. 1836

One of Macon’s most impressive houses, it was designed by master builder Elam Alexander. It is beautifully positioned on the crown of the hill overlooking Macon and the Ocmulgee River. For this magnificent site, Alexander designed a Greek temple with 18 Doric columns forming a colonnade on three sides. Joseph Bond, who bought the house in 1848, later added the flanking wings, as well as the upper balcony and a new doorway. In 1877 a grand Confederate reunion ball was held in the house by its owners, the Colemans, for ex-confederate President Jefferson Davis and his family. The delightful gazebo of Oriental design and Moorish detailing was added during the Victorian Period—a time when exploration of the Middle and Far East influenced architecture.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1897

Note the delightful front porch. In this warm climate, much use was made of exterior “rooms” before the advent of air conditioning. Many Queen Anne cottages found in the Macon Historic District were built for employees of the burgeoning railroad industry and cotton trade.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1892

This house is a fine example of the Queen Anne style with its asymmetrical floor plan, shingle work, stained glass and expansive wrap-around porch. Notice the fine detailing in the front-facing gables.

Photo by Chris Smith

Second Empire style

c. 1865

This house with a protruding bay window at left and fine wraparound porch at right, has a mansard roof embellished with double brackets, showing its Second Empire origins with Queen Anne details. The front porch was enlarged and a dormer was removed after 1910.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1903

This residence is typical of the late Victorian houses built in the Macon Historic District at the turn of the century. Notice the sunburst motif in the front-facing gable and the use of diamond-shaped window panes. The wrap-around porch is balanced by an angular two-story bay at right.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1890

This finely-detailed Queen Anne house with slate roof, wrap-around porch with turned balusters and unusual molded wood decoration was built by George Duncan who was president of the Cumberland Island Company. His wife Caroline was the daughter of William B. Johnston, builder of the Johnston Felton Hay House. The interiors feature fine parquet flooring, wainscoting and a large stained glass window.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1854

This charming cottage has had some alterations to the front façade including the projecting bay which was added c. 1870. The iron gates at the driveway came from Rose Hill Cemetery.

Photo by Chris Smith

Italianate style

c. 1860

This early house originally had a two-story porch and basement windows. The porch and solid brick foundation were added in the 20th century. Those windows are still located in the basement behind the brick foundation. The rooms at the left side are also a later addition.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1875

This residence was built by T. U. Conner who was superintendent of Academy for the Blind which was located across the street. Note the well-defined central cupola and pairs of double windows. The original Victorian front porch has been removed.

Photo by Chris Smith

Neoclassical Revival style

c. 1905

Architect Curran Ellis designed this house for Merrel P. Callaway. It was purchased in 1919 by James Hyde Porter, cotton mill owner and philanthropist, for whom architect Neel Reid redesigned the interior.

style

c. 1908

This house was built on part of the former Academy for the Blind property by the widow of Robert H. Plant who had been President of the First National Bank in Macon and Manager of the New York Life Insurance Company.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1896

This house was built by James LeConte Anderson, cousin of the Georgia poet, Sidney Lanier.

Photo by Chris Smith

Federal Revival style

c. 1910

This residence was designed by architect Neil Reid. The property had previously been part of the Georgia Blind Academy.

Photo by Chris Smith

Italian Renaissance Revival style

c. 1909

Leon Dure, President of Dure & Coburn Company, general insurers, and treasurer of The Realty Company, built this house adjacent to a side street, later named after him. At the right side near the rear notice the fine cast iron fence, originally located on the Academy for the Blind property.

Photo by Chris Smith

Beaux Arts style

c. 1901

This large residence was built by Wallace E. McCaw, whose company developed a vegetable shortening which came to be known as Crisco. Alexander Blair, a member of a well-known family of Macon architects, supplied the original plans and those for a later addition at the left rear. Later the property was purchased by Jordan Massee, president of the Bibb Brick Company, who also built the Massee Apartments on College Street. Originally the house featured balustrades on the widow’s walk and on the porch roof and decking. Note the fine stonework and leaded glass windows.

Photo by Chris Smith

Italianate style

c. 1850

This residence, originally built near the center of the block, was later moved to its present location. It once featured a cupola on the roof and a bay window at the right front.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1916

One of the owners of this house was General Walker A. Harris, a Native American authority, who was instrumental in having the Indian Mounds at Ocmulgee Fields listed as a National Monument. A plaque noting this effort is located at the Ocmulgee National Monument. General Harris’ father was Governor of Georgia from 1916–18.

Photo by Chris Smith

Mission style

c. 1928

These four small houses replaced two large Italianate antebellum mansions once owned by the Nutting and Plant families. Built prior to 1863, they were similar in style to the Johnson Felton Hay House.

Photo by Chris Smith

Craftsman style

c. 1911

Designed by Macon architect Neel Reid, this cottage was one of a number of houses built by the Roberts family, relatives of the architect, at the corner of College and Forsyth Streets. Descendants of the family lived here until 2006. The Gustave Stickley firm provided some of the hardware used in the residence. The interior features several built-in bookcases and cabinets designed by the architect.

Photo by Chris Smith

Tudor Revival style

c. 1910

Now the headquarters of the Federated Garden Clubs of Macon, this building was designed by architect Neel Reid for the Joseph N. Neel family. The house retains original furnishings, fixtures and fine paneling. It is open for tours and rentals.

Photo by Chris Smith

Romanesque Revival style

c. 1870

The first St. Paul’s Episcopal Church building was located west of the present building in a former brick railroad car shed near the tracks formerly used by the Atlanta and Western Railroad. That site is now occupied by St. Paul’s Apartments. Bricks and the round stained glass window from the original building were incorporated into the present church building which was designed by architect John J. Nevitt of Savannah, Ga. Two documented Tiffany glass memorial windows are located on either side of the altar. The rectory, built, c. 1910, is located to left of the church. Next to the rectory is the parish house, formerly the Appleton Church Home, built c. 1870 as a home for Civil War Orphans and named in honor of William H. Appleton, a New York publisher, who donated $12,500 for its construction. The church acquired the building in 1925 when the children were moved to larger quarters on Forest Hill Avenue.

Photo by Chris Smith

Neoclassical Revival style

c. 1908

This residence replaced an earlier house located on this lot. One of the early owners was Joseph B. Riley, vice president of the Lamar Taylor & Riley Drug Company, formerly located downtown on Cherry Street.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1887

This property was originally part of the Appleton Church Home. The lot was sold c. 1887 to William Snowden, a cotton broker, who built this fine structure. Formerly an art gallery, it is once again a private residence.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1910

Aurel Mayer Erwin, president of the Macon Grocery Company, lived here in the early part of the 20th century. All the houses in this block were originally part of the Appleton Church Home property. Originally the house featured a wraparound porch, part of which has now been enclosed. The house features two fine stained glass windows.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1909

Robert W. Jemison and his family built and lived in this house from 1909 until c. 1939. During World War II it was converted to two apartments. It has a large front porch and gabled roofline, both typical of the late Victorian style.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1890

Early owners of this property included a dentist named William Ford and John Boifeuillet, Editor of the Macon News. Notice the fine shingle work in the gable and the large two-story porch with turned balusters.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1908

Built for J. D. McMurray, a clerk at Dannenberg’s Department Store formerly located at Third and Poplar Streets.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1908

An early resident of this house was Rev. Dugald McLaughlin, pastor of Tatnall Square Presbyterian Church located at College and Oglethorpe Streets.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1887

Built by the Carstarphen family who lived here until c. 1970. T. J. Carstarphen was president of the Carstarphen Warehouse Company, wholesale grocers.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1888

Much of this block was originally owned by the Daly family. In 1908 Herman Hertwig, chief clerk of the Macon, Dublin and Savannah Railroad, lived here with his family. Note the fine wraparound porch.

Photo by Chris Smith

High Victorian Eclectic style

c. 1850

The Lee Alumni House was originally a one-story cottage. The second story was added years later. One of the earliest owners was Judge Charles Bartlett, a Superior Court judge and United States Congressman. During Bartlett’s ownership in 1909 President Taft delivered a speech from the porch to Mercer students, faculty and Macon citizens. In 1961 the house was rehabilitated for use as Mercer University’s Alumni House and named after Dr. W. G. Lee, a Mercer University alumnus and member of the Board of Trustees.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1878-81

The property on which this charming cottage was built was originally owned by the Tracy family whose house still stands at the corner of Orange and Magnolia Streets. It was sold by Harriett Tracy to Georgia Snyder in 1881; however, she is shown as living on Orange Street near Magnolia in 1878.

Photo by Chris Smith

Beaux Arts style

c. 1923

Funds to build the Washington Memorial Library were donated in memory of Hugh Vernon Washington by his sister. In addition to a reading room and lending library, it also houses a fine genealogical and archives collection.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1889

This house with its finely detailed wrap-around front porch and asymmetrical floor plan, both typical of the Queen Anne Style, has been the residence of two mayors of Macon. The Allman Brothers lived here c. 1970 and gave a concert to raise the initial capital for Historic Macon Foundation’s revolving fund. It was also the site of Historic Macon’s first Decorators’ Showcase in 1978.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1880

Built by widow Mary Wiley Fort for her son and mother, this was originally an Italianate-style residence with a bay window and narrow front porch. It was remodeled between 1895 and 1908 in the Queen Anne Style with an enlarged front porch featuring fluted Corinthian columns and turned railings. The bay window was replaced with the current oversized parlor window and transom. The Broadus Willingham family, who owned the house between 1887 and 1890, planted the large oaks. They also planted some of the larger trees in the park.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1899

This residence was built on part of the adjacent Anderson property for their daughter Annie when she married John McKay. Typical of the Late Victorian style are the paired columns, well-defined doorway and large-paned windows.

Photo by Chris Smith

Italianate style

c. 1859

Typical of the style is the prominent tower with round-headed windows. Notice the pedimented window headers and the arched portico leading to an arched fanlight above the doorway. The house was built by Judge Clifford Anderson, who was a member of the Confederate Congress in Richmond, Virginia, was the uncle of the poet Sidney Lanier.

Photo by Chris Smith

Neoclassical Revival style

c. 1912

Notice the large brick columns, terra-cotta detailing and windows with diamond-shaped panes, all typical of the Classic Revival style. This residence was built by Dr. A. B. Hinkle as a four-unit apartment building, now converted to four condominiums.

Photo by Chris Smith

Neoclassical Revival style

c. 1907

For over 100 years this house remained in the Damour family. Notice the finely detailed gable window, eave brackets and expansive wrap-around porch. The rusticated stone supports are precursors of today’s concrete block.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1886

This two-story /Queen Anne style residence was built by Charles E. Damour who was in the real estate business. He later built the brick house at 902 High Street. The Damour family owned this house for over 100 years. It features shingle work in the gable and a delightful cut-work frieze, turned columns and geometric balustrade at the front porch.

Photo by Chris Smith

Greek Revival style

c. 1878

Although there may have been an earlier house on this property, it appears that it was built on a portion of property purchased by Samuel S. Dunlap who built a larger residence for his family to the right of this house. He opened the first hardware store in Macon in 1866 and owned many properties in the College Hill and other areas of Macon.

Photo by Chris Smith

Neoclassical Revival style

c. 1880

Like many other late nineteenth century houses, the façade of this residence was altered about 1908 in the Classic Revival style. The impressive portico with Ionic columns, fine entry and balustrades are all typical of that style. At that time the walls were “plastered” to represent stonework. Notice the large magnolias which date from earlier than 1908. He house was built by William H. Burden who was president of the American National Bank.

Photo by Chris Smith

Greek Revival style

c. 1840

This cottage, which was turned to face High Street c. 1879, was the birthplace of Georgia poet and musician, Sidney Clopton Lanier, in 1842. Originally the house featured a small stoop at the front door. Later changes included an altered roofline with front-facing gable and dormer windows, a porch across the front façade and fanciful Victorian bargeboard, balustrades and flat cut-work porch columns. Much of the Victorian detailing has since been removed to return the cottage to its simpler Greek Revival plan.

Photo by Chris Smith

Second Empire style

c. 1877

This residence was built by S. S. Dunlap, president of Dunlap Hardware Company and vice-president of the Exchange Bank of Macon. He lived here until c. 1900. A later owner who purchased the property c. 1911 veneered the house with brick and expanded the front porch. Notice the mansard roofline, eave brackets and fine beveled glass at the front entry.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1882

This two-story residence was built for William Totten who was in the wholesale tobacco and liquor business. By the turn of the century a jeweler had purchased the property. The house features an expansive front porch with fine balustrade and columns with Doric capitals. The full-length windows provided access to the porch and additional air circulation before the advent of air conditioning.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1893

The Worsham family lived in this house for many years. Lee Worsham owned a grocery store on Poplar Street. It appears that the family built an additional house to the left of this residence c. 1915. The family then moved to the newer house and sold the corner house to Orman Daniel, a physician. Some changes have been made to both the façade and the rear of the house since its construction.

Photo by Chris Smith

Italianate style

c. 1885

Built for Joe Wells, it was later owned by Gustavius Matthews, editor of the Macon Telegraph. Other owners include J. Ellsworth Hall, an attorney and then his son, Dr. John I. Hall. At one time Dr. White, minister at the First Baptist Church lived here with his family of seven sons. His only daughter, Mabel, died as a child. Mabel White Baptist Church is named for her. This house featured a wrap-around porch, double eave brackets and a Palladian-style window in the front gable.

Photo by Chris Smith

Italianate style

c. 1877

This house was occupied until c. 1930 by three generations of the Hines family for whom it was built. Notice the eave brackets, finely detailed porch columns and balustrade and leaded glass at the front entry.

Photo by Chris Smith

Gothic Revival style

c. 1898

Constructed for the First Christian Church of Macon after a design by architect Alexander Blair III of Macon. Plans called for a tall belfry with spire at the left front and several smaller spires on the other towers. However these plans were changed prior to construction.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1875

Although the front façade has been modified, the residence still retains its front porch with decorative Victorian details. By the end of the nineteenth century this property was owned by Clyde Hoke, manager of the Macon Electric Company. The porch features cut-work columns, brackets and balustrade.

Photo by Chris Smith

Greek Revival style

c. 1872

This is one of several Greek Revival cottages that are important to the character of Magnolia Street. Many of the houses were originally owned by Macon’s early downtown entrepreneurs who worked in wholesale groceries, drugstores and dry goods stores. This cottage, owned in 1872 by George Wright, a haberdasher, who worked for a wholesale grocer, remained in his family until c. 1947. It still retains its simple symmetrical plan with Greek Revival doorway and decorative Victorian details on the front porch.

Photo by Chris Smith

Greek Revival style

c. 1875

This property was one of the lots sold by B. F. Ross, an early mayor of Macon to A. R. Tinsley as a “parcel of land” in 1873. It was owned for many years by the Stephens family and has retained its simple Greek Revival entry. The porch detailing was originally similar to the cottage at 972 Magnolia Street.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1897

A one-story house was originally constructed on this lot and was replaced by the present residence c. 1897 when it was owned by Frank Chambers, an attorney with offices on Third Street in downtown Macon. His family lived here until c. 1916. The house features an expansive front porch, fine balustrade and shingle-work in the front-facing gable.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1895

This cottage sits on a high foundation faced with rusticated stone blocks, forerunner of today’s concrete blocks. The half-story with Palladian-style window opening and shallow-pitched roof may have been added later. One of the first owners was George T. Beeland, a jeweler, who had a store at Second Street and Cotton Avenue.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1878

This property was once part of a larger tract purchased by the Ellis family in 1877. Although there may have been an earlier house on this property, the first reference in the Macon city directories to a resident at this location was in 1878 when Wesley deHaven, who was employed by J. W. Burke & Co., publishers and printers, lived here. Like many of the houses on Magnolia Street this residence was built on parts of two smaller lots which were narrower than those shown today. Notice the fine detailing on the porch with flat-cut columns, delicate spandrels and cut-work balustrade.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1893

The fine detailing and textures on this house are typical of the Queen Anne style. The stamped metal roof, shingle work and vent in the front-facing gable, large windows and a full front porch with balustrade all give this house a picturesque quality.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1878

This property is part of a larger tract purchased by the Ellis family in 1877. Notice the finely detailed front porch balanced by an angular bay window to right of the entry.

Photo by Chris Smith

Craftsman style

c. 1915

Note the wide eave overhangs and front facing gable giving shade to the front porch and second story windows. This house is similar in style and age to the residence at left and may have been constructed by the same builder.

Photo by Chris Smith

Craftsman style

c. 1908

Wide overhangs at the roofline with exposed rafters, triple windows, shallow arched openings on the front porch and strong horizontal lines typify the Craftsman style. The use of natural materials such as wood and stucco with little ornamentation was a reaction to the excesses of the Victorian period. One of the first owners of this house was W. B. Chapman, a tax collector.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1889

This simple Queen Anne-style residence has well-detailed bracketed porch columns and balustrade and a diamond-shaped vent in the front-facing gable. One of the first owners was Zacariah Culver, who clerked for a cotton broker. In 1895 the house was advertised for rent for $9.00 per month as having comfortable rooms for a small family.

Photo by Chris Smith

Craftsman style

c. 1912

In the nineteenth century this lot was part of the Tracy property which extended down Magnolia Street from Orange Street. In 1912 the rear portion of that property was subdivided into four lots on Magnolia Street. The American Foursquare style was popular from the late nineteenth century until World War II and was a reaction to the ornate Victorian style. It often incorporated Craftsman-style features as seen here, including exposed rafter ends, dormer windows, columns set on masonry or stone piers and paired or triple windows with diamond-shaped muntins in the upper sashes.

Photo by Chris Smith

American 19th Century Industrial style

c. 1883

This brick structure was built to house the engines that pumped water from the nearby springs in Washington Park to a 90-foot tall water tower that was located in a park on Orange Street near the head of High Street. The new system allowed the houses on College Hill to receive city water for which residents were charged $20.00 per year. Three cisterns located behind the engine house, which had been constructed prior to 1880, held 150,000 gallons of water. The springs in the park supplied water for both downtown and the residences on the hill. This structure is now a private residence.

Photo by Chris Smith

Craftsman style

c. 1915

Originally this property was part of the Tracy property which extended down Magnolia Street from the corner of Orange Street. When the property was subdivided this house was built in the American foursquare style with a tall, two and one-half story boxy shape, low-pitched roof and Craftsman-style exposed rafter ends. Other decorative elements include the paired columns on masonry piers, well-detailed upper windows sashes and front door with transom and sidelights.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1885

The flat-cut porch columns and spandrels give this charming cottage a picturesque quality. Notice the front-facing gable with a modern stained glass window and the well-detailed front door. Like many of the lots on Magnolia Street, this property originally extended to Washington Avenue.

Photo by Chris Smith

Neoclassical Revival style

c. 1901

Temple Beth Israel was organized in 1859 and moved to this location from Second Street at Poplar at the turn of the century. This imposing building with a central dome, full portico, and stained glass windows anchors the eastern edge of the InTown residential district.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1887

The first owner of this house was George W. Burr who was associated with Georgia Flour Mills Company Notice the fine detailing including the sunburst in the pediment above the front entry and the geometric design of the balustrade.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1880

An early owner of this residence was J. W. Cabaniss, owner of an insurance agency. The wrap-around porch features a balustrade with unusual pierced circular detailing.

Photo by Chris Smith

Greek Revival style

c. 1870

Samuel G. Hunter, and attorney and captain of the Macon Volunteers during the Spanish-American War lived in this early house. It was the rectory for Christ Church in the 1920s when the doorway and porch railings were changed to their present configuration.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1880

Richard Lawton and his family were one of the early owners of this house. He was president of the Merchants National Bank of Macon. The wrap-around porch, bay window, multi-paned transom and asymmetrical floor plan are all typical of the Queen Anne style.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1909

William Marshall and his family were the first residents of this house. He was secretary-treasurer of the W. A. Doody Company in downtown Macon, a large dry goods and furniture store. The house features cylindrical columns with Ionic capitals, dentil moldings and exposed rafter tails at the roofline.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1911

An earlier residence was located on this and the adjacent lot. It was demolished and the present house and its mirror image to the right were constructed early in the 20th century. The first owner of this house was Beverly B. Ford, a cotton merchant. The front porch features slender columns with Ionic capitals. Notice the beautifully detailed bay window at the left side.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1885

Walter R. Holmes, a dentist, lived here in the late nineteenth century. In 1908 the porch was enlarged at left when a left rear addition was built. Notice the delightful cupola and intricate design of the porch including flowerheads, shingle work and geometric detailing on the balustrade.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1903

The first owner of this residence was Leon Willingham who worked as a salesman for Calder B. Willingham, president of Willingham Cotton Mills. Notice the wrap-around porch supported by fluted columns with Ionic capitals and the well-detailed front doorway, all typical of the Queen Anne style.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1904

A larger lot accommodated an earlier house which was demolished prior to 1904 when this residence and the one to its right were built. The first tenant was W. D. Griffith, a fire insurance agent. Gabriel Ludlow, superintendent of the Virginia Carolina Chemical Company also lived here. Notice the paired columns, bay window and fine latticework detailing in the pediment.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1905

The first residents were Robert McKenney and his family. He was president and General Manager of the New Printing Company, publishers of the Macon News. The front porch features square columns with turned balusters. The high brick foundation at left was necessary because of the steep grade of Orange Street.

Photo by Chris Smith

Craftsman style

c. 1915

This bungalow was built for Arthur L. Dasher Jr., an attorney whose parents lived at the corner of Orange Terrace and Park Place. Most of the property along this side of Park Place was once owned by the Dasher family. The house features sturdy cylindrical columns, stuccoed exterior and clustered windows, typical of the Arts and Crafts style.

Photo by Chris Smith

Greek Revival style

c. 1863

This residence was built by Dr. Dudley W. Hammond, b. 1809, a surgeon who graduated from the Georgia Medical College in Augusta, Ga. Notice the fine eave brackets above the impressive portico.

Photo by Chris Smith

Italianate style

c. 1851

Built by James H. R. Washington, an early mayor of Macon, this house was originally located on College Street on the Washington Memorial Library property. It was moved to Park Place in the 1970s by the InTown Macon Neighborhood Association when the library expanded. It features delicate columns with pierced detailing, wirework balustrade and eave brackets typical of the Italianate style.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1870

This early Queen Anne style house with Italianate detailing was built by Dr. Dudley Hammond who lived in the property to right of this house. He gave it to his daughter Rosa in 1876 as a wedding present when she married Wiley J. Barnes. It has intricate detailing on the front porch, floor length windows and eave brackets, all of which add to its charm.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1875-80

This delightful cottage was built by Earlsworth Crockett who lived to right of this property for his son, Oscar, who was an auditor with the Parker Railway News Company. Typical of the Queen Anne style are the bay window, finely detailed porch, dentil molding and the asymmetrical floor plan.

Photo by Chris Smith

Italianate style

c. 1865-70

The first owner was Alexander Speer, an attorney, Congressman from Georgia before the war, major in the Confederate Army and elected to the Superior Court of Georgia in 1882. By l908 Robert Sheridan, president of T. C. Burke Company lived here. Originally the lot was larger and a portion was sold to build the house to left of this property. Notice the eave brackets, wrap-around porch and floor-length windows.

Photo by Chris Smith

Italianate style

c. 1915

This house was built for Edward A. Sheridan, a relative of Robert Sheridan who lived next door and subdivided his lot to allow for the construction. Edward Sheridan worked for the Dannenberg Company, a large dry goods store on Third and Poplar Streets in downtown Macon. Notice the paired columns on the wrap-around porch and well-detailed front entry.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1892

The first resident was William R. Ivey, a wood dealer at Bay and Elbert Streets in downtown Macon. John Burnett, who sold sewing machines, pianos and organs on Cotton Avenue, lived there c. 1908. There is fine applied detailing on the front porch frieze, supported by fluted cylindrical columns with Corinthian capitals.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1900

One of the early owners was Mrs. F. S. Dana, widow of Orlando Dana who was superintendent of printed at J. W. Burke Company in downtown Macon. The front porch features turned supports and a pedimented entry. Notice the small porch on the second floor.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1887

The first owner of this house was Arthur L. Dasher Sr., an attorney with Jones & Dasher in downtown Macon. The Dasher family owned much of this block along Orange Terrace and Park Place. Typical of the Queen Anne style is the beautifully detailed wrap-around porch, the asymmetrical bay window and the fine doorway.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1887

It appears that this cottage may originally have been a rear one-story ell of a large house that sat at the corner of Orange and Bond Streets, facing Orange Street. That house was removed c. 1909 when the Coleman family purchased the property and commissioned Neel Reid to design the brick house that now sits at left of this cottage. It is understood that he also designed the façade of this house. The first reference to it in the Macon city directories is in 1912 when Mrs. Hilsman lived here. Notice the dormer windows enclosing fan lights and the pair of double French doors giving access to the front porch.

Photo by Chris Smith

Neoclassical Revival style

c. 1900

The first owner of this house was Cecil Morgan, Deputy Clerk of the U. S. Circuit Court, vice president of Commercial National Bank and General Manager of the Georgia Kaolin Company. Notice the charming balcony on the third floor and the rusticated stone foundation.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1874

Earlsworth Crockett, a master machinist, built this finely detailed residence c. 1875. He founded Crockett Iron Works c. 1871 which later became Taylor Iron Works. Notice the beautifully carved and paneled front doors with carved rope detailing and the double eave brackets.

Photo by Chris Smith

Italianate style

c. 1869

The first owner was Virgil Powers who was Superintendent of the Southwestern Railroad, City alderman and a charter member of the Board of Education and Orphanage of Bibb County. Notice the fluted wood columns with Ionic capitals and double eave brackets. The French doors across the front were altered from the original full-length window sashes.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1885

Drewry R. Malone, a grocer and later a horseshoer, was the first owner of this property. In 1911 Mrs. M. L. Price, widow of former Mayor of Macon Sylvester B. Price, purchased the house. The front facade, which had featured a bay window and a one-story porch, was altered to its present configuration in the early 20th century, probably at the time Mrs. Price purchased the house. Notice the diamond-shaped detailing on the windows and front door.

Photo by Chris Smith

Italianate style

c. 1887

The first owner of this house was J. B. Riley who was associated with Lamar, Taylor and Riley Drug Company. The central section on the second floor was originally an open porch. French doors now give access to the expansive wrap-around porch supported by pairs of cylindrical columns.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1892

Adiel L. Adams, secretary/treasurer of the Adams Brothers Company, wholesale grocers, lived here with his family. The front porch, originally open, has been enclosed. Notice the original stamped tin roof and interesting latticework detailing.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1892

The first resident was Edward Ryals, an attorney, 115 whose family lived here until c. 1905. J. F. Sellers, dean of Mercer University and George Sparks, a professor at Mercer University were later owners. The expansive porch is supported by fluted columns with Corinthian capitals.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1884

One of the earliest houses built to take advantage of the view of Tatnall Square Park. The first owner was William Taylor of Mallary & Taylor Ironworks. An example of the ironwork is seen on the second story. Note also the finely detailed porch frieze and balustrade.

Photo by Chris Smith

Neoclassical Revival style

c. 1904

This house was built by Dr. Edward Hope. In the 1930s John L. Morris, manager of the Macon Chamber of Commerce, purchased the property. Note the Palladian-style window and the fine double-door entry.

Photo by Chris Smith

Italianate style

c. 1872

Originally a two-story residence, the house suffered extensive fire damage c. 1976 and was reduced to one story. It was built by William Hazlehurst, a banker. Note the fine framework on the window on the front porch, a reminder of the architectural detailing typical of the Italianate style.

Photo by Chris Smith

Craftsman style

c. 1913

The first owner was Robert Pulliam, a professor at Mercer University. The lap siding outlining the front porch is typical of the Arts & Crafts style.

Photo by Chris Smith

Tudor Revival style

c. 1922

Frank Elbridge Adams, secretary/treasurer of Taylor Iron Works was one of the first owners. Notice the half-timbering on the second story, typical of the Tudor Revival style.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1905

This property was originally part of a large lot fronting on Adams Street, owned by William Hazlehurst. It was subdivided into two parcels c. 1905 when two houses with similar facades were built. Typical of the late Queen Anne style it has an asymmetrical plan with a finely detailed entry and wrap-around porch.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1900

The Rev. B. D. Ragsdale, a professor at Mercer University lived here at the turn of the century. Originally the front porch was set back at the right of the front entry where a bay window is now located.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1905

The first resident of this house was Bennett Van Houten, Secretary-Treasurer of the Central Georgia Heating and Plumbing Company. This block of Lawton Avenue was formerly known as Bellevue Avenue and then Hazel Street.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1892

This residence was home to Guy Hilsman, a bookkeeper in the late 19th century. He petitioned the city for improved trolley car routes to serve the Mercer and the Huguenin Heights area. Notice the finely detailed front porch that wraps around to face both Lawton and Linden Avenues.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1905

The first resident was Henry Spier, an engineer with the Georgia, Southern and Florida Railroad. When the house was built it was outside the city limits. Linden Avenue was known as Boundary Street.

Photo by Chris Smith

Neoclassical Revival style

c. 1908

The first resident was Charles W. Johnson, who was associated with Merritt Hardware. This house features a full-width front porch with curved central section, all supported by six fluted columns with Corinthian capitals.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1894

This charming cottage was built for Richard S. Thorpe who was owner of the Consumers Oil Company. The asymmetrical façade with a front-facing gable is typical of the Queen Anne style.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1894

The first resident was Annie Griswold, a widow. Her husband, Charles Griswold, was a nephew of Col. Thomas Hardeman, a U. S. Congressman from Georgia. The full-width front porch with its spoolwork and slender columns gives shade to the front façade. Notice the twin gables above.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1892

Charles Rhodes, chief clerk of the Georgia, Southern and Florida Railway, was one of the first owners. Notice the spoolwork, turned columns and balusters on the front porch.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1903

Mrs. Mattie Hilsman, widow of Stokes Hilsman who 130 was a traveling salesman, was the first owner. The front porch features quarter-round spandrels and full-length windows. A small second-floor porch provides fresh air to the bedrooms.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1911

The first reference to this house is in 1911 when Albert D. Akin, a civil engineer was the owner. Notice the cylindrical columns on the balustrade porch and the front door with half-glass insert and transom above, all typical of the Queen Anne style.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1908

The first owners were Mr. & Mrs. Clarence Williams. He was a bookkeeper at S. R. Jacques & Tinsley Co., wholesale grocers. By 1917 Rev. Paul Weber, pastor of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of the Redeemer lived here. The simple front porch is supported by cylindrical columns with molded detailing and a picket balustrade.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1900

William B. Wood, a grocer and meat merchant on Cotton Avenue, was the first owner of this charming residence. The eave brackets, turned supports and diagonal detailing on the front porch all give it a picturesque quality

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1905

W. F. Holt, a conductor with the Central of Georgia Railroad lived here at the turn of the twentieth century. The simple detailing is typical of the Late Victorian style.

Photo by Chris Smith

Craftsman style

c. 1905

This twenty-first century house was built to be architecturally compatible with its neighboring historic buildings. The window detailing and porch columns resting on high plinths are typical of the Arts and Crafts.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1900

The first owner of this charming cottage was Asmon Deidria who owned a produce company. The full-width porch is supported by turned columns with a spoolwork frieze.

Photo by Chris Smith

Italian Renaissance Revival style

c. 1908

This residence which had major alterations to its front façade after 1960, was built as a duplex. The original façade featured on one-story full-width porch. One of the early residents was F. B. Gregory, a physician.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1903

Rev. J. G. Harrison, pastor of Tatnall Square Baptist Church lived here at the turn of the century. A later owner was Ellis H. Lafayette, a musician at the Palace Theatre on Cherry Street. The front porch originally wrapped around to the right side.

Photo by Chris Smith

Craftsman style

c. 1922

The first reference to a house on this property is 1922 when W. E. Farrar, dean at Mercer University, lived here. The shallow-pitched, front-facing gables with bracket detailing, casement windows and shingle walls are all typical of the Arts and Crafts style.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1908

James E. Yates, president of Jones Grocery Company on Fifth Street, was the first resident of this house which features an expansive front porch supported by cylindrical columns.

Photo by Chris Smith

Craftsman style

c. 1912

Ira Teagle, a collector with the Macon Telegraph, and his family lived here in 1912. The house features a full-width balustrade porch with square columns. A small dormer window is centered on the hipped roof.

Photo by Chris Smith

Craftsman style

c. 1912

William R. Goodyear, president of Goodyear Long Machinery Company on Broadway was the first owners of this residence. The roof is centered by a dormer with gabled roof all above a full-width balustrade porch with cylindrical columns.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1909

This cottage, with an asymmetrical front-facing gable, wrap-around porch with cylindrical columns set on high brick piers, was built in 1909. The first resident was Frank S. Baskerville, a telephone operator. Since 1951, it has been owned by the Stroud family.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1911

J. L. Miller, owner of Miller Cycle Company on Mulberry Street, lived here in 1911. The cottage features a hipped roof with central front-facing gable above a full-width porch supported by cylindrical columns.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1903

Joseph Higginson, a letter carrier, and his family were the first owners of the house when the street was known as Boundary Avenue. The expansive wrap-around porch, double columns and central dormer are all typical of the late Victorian style.

Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1897

William M. Ross, assistant clerk at City Court, lived here in the late nineteenth century. Notice the angular bay window, front door with stained glass inserts and expansive wraparound porch.

Photo by Chris Smith

Greek Revival style

c. 1872

The first owner of this charming cottage was James E. Ellis of Ellis & Cutter, a company supplying building materials. Notice the typical Greek Revival doorway with sidelights and transom and the beautifully detailed front porch.

Photo by Chris Smith

Craftsman style

c. 1917

This residence was built as a duplex. Mary and Stephen Howard, manager of the James Kingman Lumber Company and Marion and Jesse Terry, manager of T. I. Harris, a loan company, were the first residents. Notice the front porches below a bracketed gable and a similar decorative gable above the front entry, typical of the Arts & Crafts style.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. c. 1860

The first owner of this cottage was Oliver Porter, a farmer. Appleton Avenue was originally known as Short Street. This residence features a fine entry door, bracketed eaves and beautifully detailed front porch.

Photo by Chris Smith

Craftsman style

c. 1915

This residence was originally owned by Lena and Michel Bloch who ran the Bloch Hide Company. Notice the balustrade porches and exposed rafter tails, typical of the early twentieth century late Victorian style.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1907

The first owners of this cottage were the Rufus Evans family. Mr. Evans was secretary/treasurer of Merritt & Co., wholesale grocers. Notice the turned columns on the wraparound porch, typical of the late Queen Anne style.

Photo by Chris Smith

Craftsman style

c. 1910

This two-story residence was enlarged from a smaller one-and-a-half story cottage c. 1910 by the Storrs family who lived here for more than 50 years. Robert Storrs, an attorney, was clerk to the district attorney in Macon in the early 20th century. Note the clustered columns on high plinths and the exposed rafters, typical of the late Victorian style.

Photo by Chris Smith

Federal style

c. 1870

The first owner of this house was Hattie Tracy, daughter of Edward Dorr Tracy of Macon. Originally the house has a full length front porch, a one-story room set back at the left side and two outbuildings at the rear.

Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1894

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Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1887

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Photo by Chris Smith

Folk Victorian style

c. 1897

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Photo by Chris Smith

Italianate style

c. 1882

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Photo by Chris Smith

Queen Anne style

c. 1895

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End of route

Lights on Macon’s historic home tours are designed with everyone in mind, regardless of age, experience, or architectural knowledge. All the information and historical background you need, plus information about the architecture of each home, is right on the website; just click on each home to view. Also, we designed the tour to be totally flexible: you can choose to walk or drive; routes can be set for as short or as long of a tour as you want. You aren’t limited in how much you can enjoy our historic homes-- spend all day if you want!

We can help you design the right tour for you or your group’s needs; see the filters above and the map/direction links to set up a tour that suits you best. If you want the guesswork taken out for you, check out the curated tour listed above, featuring the iconic Hay House and Magnolia Street homes. You can always send us a message if you need a recommendation as well; our knowledgeable and friendly staff will be happy to point you in the right direction.

Got any questions about the tour or any of the beautiful historic homes you saw? Visit our FAQ page or get in touch with us. Finally, visit our History page to learn more about the history of the city of Macon, and a bit about the tour itself.

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